Tuesday, April 6, 2010

A Game to See (6)

Yamashita Keigo has been one of the top Japanese player for the past (more or less) 10 years.

In his early year, he was recognized to be "the one whose playing style is a fresh air for Japanese go." as he played bold and innovative fuseki, including mokuhazushi and takamoku combination, tengen, and go-no-go (5-5 point).

Here is one of the game example where he used his 5-5 move and won the game by an early resignation against the famous Kobayashi Koichi at game 2 of the 25th Japanese Gosei.


(;CA[Windows-1252]SZ[19]AP[MultiGo:4.4.4]EV[25th Japanese Gosei, title match #2]
DT[2000-07-13]PB[Yamashita Keigo]BR[6p]PW[Kobayashi Koichi]WR[9p]KM[5.5]RE[B+R]
MULTIGOGM[1]
;B[oe];W[dp];B[qo];W[pc];B[nc];W[qe];B[pg];W[dd];B[rg];W[nb];B[mb];W[ob];B[mc];W[op]
;B[oo];W[no];B[on];W[qp];B[np];W[pp];B[nq];W[rn];B[mo];W[qn];B[pm];W[qk];B[fp];W[dn]
;B[fn];W[dl];B[fl];W[fc];B[dk];W[ck];B[cj];W[cl];B[pk];W[qj];B[pj];W[gm];B[fm];W[hq]
;B[dq];W[cq];B[ep];W[jp];B[jn];W[ho];B[cp];W[do];B[cr];W[bq];B[er];W[im];B[bp];W[bo]
;B[aq];W[bj];B[in];W[hn];B[hl];W[jm];B[kn];W[hm];B[jk];W[kr];B[rd];W[re];B[rc];W[sd]
;B[sf];W[se];B[qd];W[pd];B[pe];W[rb];B[km];W[ik];B[ij];W[id];B[cc];W[dc];B[cd];W[ce]
;B[be];W[bf];B[gc];W[gd];B[fb];W[ec];B[cf];W[de];B[bg];W[bd];B[af];W[bc];B[bi];W[mr]
;B[dj];W[co];B[br];W[ak];B[jf];W[jc];B[qf];W[qc];B[kd];W[jl];B[kk];W[hf];B[pr];W[ii]
;B[hj];W[ig];B[lq];W[lr];B[po];W[ro];B[rq];W[rp];B[nr];W[ri];B[io];W[ip];B[kq];W[jq]
;B[ir];W[hr];B[gp];W[hp];B[hs];W[gs];B[is];W[fr];B[gq];W[gr];B[ms];W[kl];B[ll];W[hk]
;B[gl];W[il];B[gj];W[lk];B[mq])

1 comments:

TaoTeaKing said...

Woooow i did not know that. 5-5 point!? Very interesting ! Thnx.